How do you plan on copying it to the other end?<span></span><br><br>On Friday, October 19, 2012, Michael K. Avanessian  wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">






<div lang="EN-US" link="blue" vlink="purple">
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal">Iím currently tunneling SSH over SSL using stunnel.<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u>†<u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">I thought that stunneled ssh data was safe.† However, recently Iíve read that if going through a sophisticated http/https proxy, itís possible to be hacked by a ďlegitimateĒ mitm attack to fool an SSL client.<u></u><u></u></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u>†<u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Is it still possible to configure stunnel so that ssl canít be compromised between both ends?<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u>†<u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Iím going to take a wild guess here; which Iím sure Iím probably wrong.† But, could I just install stunnel; and, let it create automatically a self-signed (stunnel.pem) certificate fileÖ then just copy that file to the stunnel install on
 the other end?† That way both sides are already aware of each otherís public keys; and, wouldnít be vulnerable during the initial unencrypted handshake?<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u>†<u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Iím sure Iím probably way off; and, thereís more I need to do in stunnelís configuration to further ensure the SSL wonít be compromised.. such as the stunnel ďverifyĒ setting.† Iím not sure which setting to have it; and, what it actually
 does.<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u>†<u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Iím hoping someone could shed some light on this with simple suggested client<span style="font-family:Wingdings">ŗ</span> server configs that would keep ssl uncompromised as much as possible.<u></u><u></u></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u>†<u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Thanks in advance!<u></u><u></u></p>
</div>
</div>

</blockquote>