<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-2" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  <title></title>
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
Michael Renner wrote:
<blockquote cite="mid:200901232005.07399.michael.renner@gmx.de"
 type="cite">
  <pre wrap="">On Friday 23 January 2009, Bill Eldridge wrote:
  </pre>
  <blockquote type="cite">
    <pre wrap="">Michael Renner wrote:
    </pre>
    <blockquote type="cite">
      <pre wrap="">On Friday 23 January 2009, Bill Eldridge wrote:
      </pre>
      <blockquote type="cite">
        <pre wrap="">I was interested in whether there's a simple
way to have stunnel redirect traffic from a public Web browser/port
to my home Web browser behind my DSL firewall
(no ports opened/forwarded for incoming connections on the router,
only outgoing-initiated)
        </pre>
      </blockquote>
      <pre wrap="">Moin,

it is not clear to what you want to do. From a public web browser to your
home web browser?

Can you clarify your setup?
      </pre>
    </blockquote>
    <pre wrap="">As an example if I run Apache on my home machine, I'd like it to start
the tunnel when
I turn it on, have it automatically set up stunnel to a Linux box I have
on the public net,
and have anything to port 8090 on the Linux box get passed to my home
machine 8080.
    </pre>
  </blockquote>
  <pre wrap=""><!---->
Even this is the stunnel list, I recommend to use a reverse ssh tunnel 
together with netcat to do this.
  </pre>
</blockquote>
The particular reason has to do with having stunnel on all of the boxes
I'm interested<br>
in and not having ssh on all of them. (The reasoning is a bit more
convoluted than that,<br>
but let's just say I'm interested in doing this with stunnel in
particular if possible, not <br>
alternative  approaches, but thanks, yes, the ssh approach is very
straightforward.<br>
<br>
So, can stunnel create an outgoing tunnel from behind a firewall for
the Web server to<br>
follow back in (similar to the ssh scenario you describe? Though
actually you don't<br>
need the netcat portion there: ssh -R handles all of that fine)<br>
<blockquote cite="mid:200901232005.07399.michael.renner@gmx.de"
 type="cite">
  <pre wrap="">
Setup netcat as an inetd application listening to port 8090 and redirect 
anything to localhost:8080 at the remote host.

At your local maschine (with the apache) start a reverse ssh tunnel, redirect 
anything from localhost:8080 (in this case your remote maschine) to your 
local machine:8080

home # ssh -R 8080:localhost:8090 user@remote
You should use a key to get rid of the password question!

Add a line like this to the remote /etc/inetd.conf:
8090 stream tcp nowait nobody /usr/bin/nc /usr/bin/nc  localhost 8080

CU
  </pre>
</blockquote>
<br>
</body>
</html>